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How to Write a Proposed Decision to the ALJ and Get Paid Sooner Than Later


 

Thanks to this exclusive webcast and former ALJ and decision writer, Bob Soltis, you'll learn how to write a proposed decision to include with your Request for Hearing.

Price: $229.00

Product Code: R060717


  

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Today, with the backlog at the Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals, more than a few administrative law judges (ALJs) are asking appellants to submit proposed decisions. Will you be ready and able to give the ALJ something they can actually use? With new attorney adjudicators looking for cases to pay on the record, you'll be able to attach a proposed decision to include with your Request for Hearing. And thanks to this exclusive webcast with former ALJ and decision writer, Bob Soltis, you'll learn how to write a persuasive proposed decision.

This RACmonitor webcast includes a template, ready to complete so you won't have to start from scratch. So, when, at the completion of your hearing, the ALJ says, "Send me a proposed decision," you'll be able to submit one. And submitting a concise proposed decision is your best chance to persuade the ALJ to issue an on-the-record decision.

Be ready when you're asked for a proposed decision. Your chances of getting paid fast are better than ever before since you will know how to write a compelling letter that will not only get you paid sooner rather than later, but will be useful to the ALJ, and meet the requirements of 42 CFR § 405.1046(a).

Learning Objectives:
By attending this exclusive webcast, you come away better prepared to convince the new attorney adjudicators, as well as the ALJs. Additionally, during this webcast you will…
  • Understand how ALJ teams work
  • Know how to write persuasive findings of fact
  • Learn how to concisely write an argument for the analysis section of their decision
  • Know how to submit proposed decisions that satisfy 42 CFR § 405.1046(a) requirements
  • Learn how to overcome QIC and RAC arguments